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#1 Wednesday 4th January 2017 23:17:24

Lady-Hynarc
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Registered: Monday 9th April 2012
Posts: 650

Reversing in a straight line

Something that occurred to me when I was thinking about the potential test changes.  My understanding (and therefore my teaching) is that when reversing you should look predominantly backwards i.e., over the left shoulder and out of the back window - using the mirrors is cheating!  This obviously does not negate the necessity for all round obs.

When doing a reverse on the right hand side of the road - as is going to be included when the new tests are adopted - do you look over your left shoulder, which actually gives an illogical view for the prevalent danger or the right shoulder where the view is extremely restricted, probably to the point where it is insufficient?  Is it preferable in that situation to use the right door mirror predominantly?

Thanks

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Wednesday 4th January 2017 23:17:24

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Re: Reversing in a straight line



#2 Thursday 5th January 2017 08:39:56

reddragonbus
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From: Edinburgh
Registered: Sunday 5th February 2006
Posts: 1,660

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Why is using mirror cheating?

Drivers should employ effective all round observation at all times.

If reversing on the right I would suggest looking over the right shoulder.


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#3 Thursday 5th January 2017 10:46:58

Zipper
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From: Darwin, Northern Territory Aus
Registered: Friday 20th August 2004
Posts: 2,707
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Re: Reversing in a straight line

reddragonbus wrote:

Why is using mirror cheating? Drivers should employ effective all round observation at all times ...

I thought that too


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#4 Thursday 5th January 2017 14:08:20

Lady-Hynarc
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Registered: Monday 9th April 2012
Posts: 650

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Using the mirrors rather then looking over shoulders means that you are looking forwards (the mirror is looking backwards wink ) It also eliminates the benefit of peripheral vision.  When using the mirror peripheral vision is what is ahead not what is behind.  I agree that you should use constant all round observations but I always understood that the predominant view should be in the direction of travel...

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#5 Friday 6th January 2017 13:04:20

kaf
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From: Wiltshire
Registered: Sunday 5th August 2007
Posts: 3,330
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Re: Reversing in a straight line

Problems of using mirror alone.
1. It's like looking through a letterbox, no peripheral view.
2. It's a 2 dimensional view, like a tv screen, reduced depth perception, so judgement of speed and distance is hampered.

Solution, find the view or views that give you the best view of
a) Your direction of movement
b) potential dangers.

Be prepared to change where you are looking during the manoeuvres, pausing if you need to.

Teach that and you can't go wrong. It varies according to location.

Last edited by kaf (Friday 6th January 2017 13:05:08)

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#6 Friday 6th January 2017 23:39:19

Zipper
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From: Darwin, Northern Territory Aus
Registered: Friday 20th August 2004
Posts: 2,707
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Re: Reversing in a straight line

kaf wrote:

... using mirror alone.
1. It's like looking through a letterbox, no peripheral view.
2. It's a 2 dimensional view, like a tv screen, reduced depth perception, so judgement of speed and distance is hampered ...

Yes - these are the 2 reasons I tell my students that window views are generally superior to mirrors views (but use everything available to give you a sufficient view).

kaf wrote:

... Be prepared to change where you are looking during the manoeuvres, pausing if you need to ...

Instructors down here like to teach to keep looking out the back window and their learners build up a considerable speed - not safe!
I teach to keep the speed right down, look in the LH side mirror periodically to check distance from kerb and footpath activity, and to stop if there is the slightest doubt as to their speed or surrounding activity, and if they are out of position, stopping and looking forward will confirm their position in relation to the kerb.

Drivers down here have a macho gung-ho approach to driving (a lot of the women too!) making reversing with traffic around very risky.
An Australian road rule states that reversing should only be done when absolutely necessary - does the UK have a similar rule?


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I'm not 65! I'm only $59.95+tax
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#7 Saturday 7th January 2017 14:33:48

trunkmonkey
Member
Registered: Thursday 5th March 2009
Posts: 754

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Zipper wrote:
kaf wrote:

... using mirror alone.
1. It's like looking through a letterbox, no peripheral view.
2. It's a 2 dimensional view, like a tv screen, reduced depth perception, so judgement of speed and distance is hampered ...

Yes - these are the 2 reasons I tell my students that window views are generally superior to mirrors views (but use everything available to give you a sufficient view).

kaf wrote:

... Be prepared to change where you are looking during the manoeuvres, pausing if you need to ...

Instructors down here like to teach to keep looking out the back window and their learners build up a considerable speed - not safe!
I teach to keep the speed right down, look in the LH side mirror periodically to check distance from kerb and footpath activity, and to stop if there is the slightest doubt as to their speed or surrounding activity, and if they are out of position, stopping and looking forward will confirm their position in relation to the kerb.

Drivers down here have a macho gung-ho approach to driving (a lot of the women too!) making reversing with traffic around very risky.
An Australian road rule states that reversing should only be done when absolutely necessary - does the UK have a similar rule?

Yes, we have two offences relating to reversing. One is unnecessary reversing which for some obscure reason is a Construction and Use offence and the second one is unique to motorways.
The motorway offence is deemed the more serious, hence it attracts 3 penalty points.

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#8 Saturday 7th January 2017 21:27:34

Evan
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Registered: Sunday 27th December 2009
Posts: 2,059

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Which is why vans have no reverse gear  big_smile

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#9 Sunday 8th January 2017 08:30:36

reddragonbus
Verified Member
From: Edinburgh
Registered: Sunday 5th February 2006
Posts: 1,660

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Evan wrote:

Which is why vans have no reverse gear  big_smile

They only have reverse gear if they beep......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_fMorj8-Eg


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#10 Sunday 8th January 2017 12:10:08

pegasus
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From: north west
Registered: Friday 25th February 2005
Posts: 3,317

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Hi
Interesting, it is definitely not a 7500 kg vehicle as the video title implies, it might be a 4700 kg one but is more likely to be a 3500 kg.

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#11 Sunday 8th January 2017 12:46:18

Joe24
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Registered: Friday 18th May 2012
Posts: 321

Re: Reversing in a straight line

Funny how we sometimes over think things. Have good all round observation. Cover all bases.

You can analyse left right and centre (pun intended) but at the end of the day it is simply good 360degree obs that are required to execute a safe reverse.

OP was talking about the new test format but if we are determined to change tac what would the observations be to reverse a jumbo jet around a corner? yikes

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#12 Sunday 8th January 2017 15:15:01

trunkmonkey
Member
Registered: Thursday 5th March 2009
Posts: 754

Re: Reversing in a straight line

pegasus wrote:

Hi
Interesting, it is definitely not a 7500 kg vehicle as the video title implies, it might be a 4700 kg one but is more likely to be a 3500 kg.

Its 5200kgs. The twin wheels are the tell tale sign.
For the C1 test vehicle has to be of box construction with a plated weight over 4000kgs.
The first time I turned up for test with a similar vehicle the Ex took some convincing it was suitable..
Showed him the Ministry plate and tacho. He shook his head and said Right, let's go then.

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#13 Sunday 8th January 2017 23:59:07

reddragonbus
Verified Member
From: Edinburgh
Registered: Sunday 5th February 2006
Posts: 1,660

Re: Reversing in a straight line

pegasus wrote:

Hi
Interesting, it is definitely not a 7500 kg vehicle as the video title implies, it might be a 4700 kg one but is more likely to be a 3500 kg.

C1 7.5 tonne test, it doesn't say the vehicle is 7.5 tonnes. But it is a LGV and has a valid VTG6 plate and goods vehicle MOT and is used routinely to conduct C1 practical tests and module 4 LGV CPC tests.


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